Always striving upwards

Deputy Principal – Student Wellbeing

Important message to students and families 

Entering College grounds

In line with current Department of Health guidelines, parents are advised that only those who are vaccinated against COVID-19 may enter the school grounds. For those permitted to enter, please ensure that you sign in using the QR code and show your vaccination status to an Office staff member. Thank you for your support with this and all other COVID-safe measures as we work to keep our community safe. 

Student Safety Reminder

With the return of on site learning please remember to be mindful of driving behaviours that put students at risk and inconvenience the school’s neighbours. These include double parking; parking at an angle between parallel parked cars and then reversing as students are crossing the road; parking across driveways.

Again, we urge you to put student safety and driver courtesy first. Students can be dropped off or collected from neighbouring streets – the exercise and time to clear their thoughts is of immense value. The current congestion and driver behaviours in Latrobe Street are likely to result in injury.

Student Health

Please remember that if your daughter is not well, do not send her to school. A student who attends sickbay will not be able to remain there and parents/carers will be contacted to collect their child.

The current Catholic Education Commission of Victoria’s COVID-19 guidelines note that, in the interest of public health and managing the pandemic, the key behaviours for reducing COVID-19 transmission include:

  • Staying at home when unwell
  • Performing regular hand hygiene
  • Physical distancing where possible
  • Wearing a mask on public transport

Symptoms to watch out for include:

  • fever
  • chills or sweats
  • cough
  • sore throat
  • shortness of breath
  • runny nose
  • loss or change in sense of smell or taste.

Some people may also experience headache, muscle soreness, stuffy nose, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea.

If a student has persistent symptoms due to an underlying condition such as hay fever or asthma, the student should still be tested for COVID-19 if they develop symptoms that are different to or worse than their usual symptoms. Students whose symptoms are clearly typical for their underlying condition can continue to attend school.

Parents/carers should also consider getting a medical certificate from the child’s treating GP to confirm that it is safe for them to attend school with persistent symptoms that may overlap with some of the symptoms of COVID-19 such as cough or runny nose.

How to support your young person

Adolescent mental health and wellbeing – How to support your young person (Headspace)

All young people need a safe place to call home, where they can be themselves and feel relaxed and valued.
A supportive family can make a big difference to how well a young person adjusts to the challenges of adolescence.

Provide a safe, secure and loving environment

All young people need a safe place to call home, where they can be themselves and feel relaxed and valued. A supportive family can make a big difference to how well a young person adjusts to the challenges of adolescence. Finding ways to remind your young person how much they’re loved becomes even more important if conflict becomes more common. It’s important that they know you’re there for them and are available to hear their concerns and issues.

Spend quality time together

Prioritising quality time together is always important. It maintains a positive connection and keeps the door open for meaningful discussions to happen. Showing interest in things your young person is interested in and finding activities you can do together helps build and maintain strong relationships.

Talk early and talk often

Conversations with young people aren’t always easy. Picking a suitable time can help. Find a time when your young person is happy and relaxed, not when they are tired, irritable or when there has been recent conflict. Most young people respond better to informal chats. Try having smaller conversations more often. You could find an activity you both enjoy and engage in conversation then. A chat while driving or walking can also help your young person feel more comfortable – try to avoid sitting face-on as it can make it harder for people to open up and feel relaxed.

Hear and see things from their perspective

Finding ways to remind your young person how much they are loved becomes even more important if conflict becomes more common. It’s important that they know you’re there for them and are available to hear their concerns and issues. Timely and honest conversations with your teachers’ Homeroom teacher, subject teacher, or Year Level Leader are important. Please talk to us before an issue becomes too big to handle or more complex than it needs to be.